Wednesday, July 1, 2020

Two Bosworth-Related Articles Listed in 'Pneuma Review' Roundup

By Roscoe Barnes III, PhD
Author, F.F. Bosworth: The Man Behind "Christ the Healer"
Copyright (c) 2020

#FFBosworth
#BosworthMatters



I was happy to learn recently that two of my articles (blog posts) are listed in a lineup of “significant articles” published by The Pneuma Review. I’m grateful to my friend, John Lathrop, for bringing the list to my attention. As I posted on Facebook and other social media platforms, it is an honor to be included with the important writers and scholars whose work is highlighted in the piece.

The Pneuma Review article, “Spring 2020: Other Significant Articles” (June 25, 2020), can be viewed here or by visiting this link: http://pneumareview.com/spring-2020-other-significant-articles/
My work is listed as follows:

Roscoe Barnes III, “Remembering Dr. Vinson Synan, Historian Extraordinaire of Pentecostal Church HistoryRoscoe Reporting (April 3, 2020).


I am sincerely grateful to The Pneuma Review for publishing this list. In addition to my work, you will see articles by such important figures as Chris Green, John Lathrop, Daniel Isgrigg, Craig Keener, and Andrew K. Gabriel, among others.


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Reminder: "F.F. Bosworth History" is now on Twitter. Follow @bosworth_fred

Note: My book, F.F. Bosworth: The Man Behind "Christ the Healer," can be purchased here with a 25% discount. Use the discount code: BOSWORTH25.


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Want to know more
about F.F. Bosworth?

Follow the Bosworth Matters blog!
Visit here:
ffbosworth.strikingly.com

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For more information:
Visit the F.F. Bosworth page here. Questions about the research and commentary on F.F. Bosworth may be directed to Roscoe Barnes III, Ph.D., via email at doctorbarnes3@gmail.com or roscoebarnes3@yahoo.com. For updates on F.F. Bosworth history, simply follow this blog or @bosworth_fred and @Roscoebarnes3 on Twitter. #ChristTheHealer #BosworthMention #BosworthMatters

Monday, June 29, 2020

Wilkinson County Park: My Sanctuary on Sunday (6/28/2020)

By Roscoe Barnes III
Copyright (c) 2020

#Mississippi


Wilkinson County Park, Woodville, Miss.
Photo by Roscoe Barnes III (c)2020
--------------------

This is a wonderful place of prayer and reflection, even on a steamy hot and humid sunny day. On Saturday, June 27, 2020, I managed to squeeze in a 5-mile walk around the lake at Wilkinson County Park. It was hot but I completed my walk. On Sunday, the heat was unbearable. I tried to walk but stopped at 3 miles. I drank plenty of water to stay hydrated. After taking a short break, I went home. Sometimes we have to know our limits, even in beautiful places like the park.

#Mississippi #WilkinsonCountyPark



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ROSCOE BARNES III, Ph.D., is a writer, chaplain, historian, and former newspaper reporter. He is the author of more than a dozen books and Gospel tracts. For more information about his work and history, see his Personal Profile here or visit his website: http://www.roscoebarnes.net. Connect with him on Twitter (@roscoebarnes3) or by email: roscoebarnes3@yahoo.com.

Friday, June 26, 2020

Wilkinson Prison's Donation Story in Two Local Papers

#MTCMakesADifference


From The Bluff City Post in Natchez, Miss.

I was very pleased to see this story in two newspapers. It appeared in The Woodville Republican (Woodville, Miss.) and in The Bluff City Post (Natchez, Miss.) It is also featured on the MTC website. It can be seen here or by following this link: https://www.mtctrains.com/in-the-news/news-delivering-care-packages-to-elderly-residents/

From The Woodville Republican in Woodville, Miss.

 
#PrivatePrisons
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ROSCOE BARNES III, Ph.D., is a writer, chaplain, historian, and former newspaper reporter. He is the author of more than a dozen books and Gospel tracts. For more information about his work and history, see his Personal Profile here or visit his website: http://www.roscoebarnes.net. Connect with him on Twitter (@roscoebarnes3) or by email: roscoebarnes3@yahoo.com.

Monday, June 15, 2020

Dr. J. Gordon Melton's 'Resource Guide for the Study of Pentecostalism in Texas'

An essential tool for scholars, historians, and students of the Pentecostal movement in the Lone Star State

By Roscoe Barnes III, PhD
Author, F.F. Bosworth: The Man Behind "Christ the Healer"
Copyright (c) 2020

#FFBosworth
#BosworthMatters




Dr. J. Gordon Melton of Baylor University has published a book that will undoubtedly become the essential go-to source for research on Pentecostalism in Texas. The book is titled, Resource Guide for the Study of Pentecostalism in Texas (Institute for Studies of Religion, 2020). It is a compilation of vital resources (annotated notes and bibliography) that Melton gathered in his research for "the formal narrative" he is writing about the Pentecostal movement in Texas. He published it with the hope that it might benefit "colleagues who are studying either Pentecostalism in general or Texas religious history."

Melton’s Resource Guide covers the Pentecostal movementin Texas from the 1900s to the present. He presents a list of books, articles, and websites by and about numerous pioneers and important leaders in the movement. He features notes and commentary for such pioneers as F.F. Bosworth, Raymond T. Richey, W.V. Grant, David Nunn, Gordon Lindsay, Kenneth E. Hagin, H.C. Noah, R. W. Schambach, A.A. Allen, T.D. Jakes, John Osteen and Joel Osteen, among others. Some of the people featured are lessor known leaders in the movement. Fortunately, his work is not limited to the contributions of men. Some of the women featured are Elizabeth Sisson, Sandra Pratt Martin, C.F. W. Loftis, Helen Chandler, Maude Dulaney, Dorothy Deaddrick, Arizona Juanita Dranes, Lucy Farrow, Naomi Dowdy, and Sarah Larson.

For many of the people mentioned, Melton includes biographical material. He also provides snippets of commentary for some of the books and other sources. For example, he shares a brief note after Reuben Armstrong’s book, Snakes in the Pulpit (2007), which appears under the “Prosperity Gospel” section. Melton describes the book as a “poorly researched attack on T.D. Jakes, Joel Osteen, Eddie Long and Creflo Dollar.”

Melton devotes an entire section to African Americans and the Church of God in Christ. He also highlights the contributions of Mexican Americans and Spanish-Speaking Pentecostals in Texas. One interesting feature of the Resource Guide is the section on the Pentecostal preachers who published their own study Bibles. The list of Bibles includes:

Kenneth Copeland Reference Edition (Kenneth Copeland)
The Life Plan Study Bible (John Hagee)
Rhema Study Bible (Kenneth E. Hagin)
Revival Study Bible (Steve Hill)
The Master’s Healing Presence Bible (Benny Hinn)
Women of Destiny Bible (Cindy Jacobs)
The T.D. Jakes Relationship Bible (T.D. Jakes)
The Wisdom Bible (Mike Murdock)
Hope for Today Bible (Joel and Victoria Osteen)

Melton lists resources for many important topics in Pentecostalism, such as the prosperity gospel, divine healing, the new apostolic reformation, Spirit baptism, speaking in tongues, gifts of the spirit, etc.

According to Melton, he became interested in the topic of Pentecostalism in Texas when he began to see the importance of the movement -- and the impact it was having -- throughout the Lone Star State. There was also a need for new research, as that there was no history written about the movement in this area. Melton notes the closest thing written on the topic to date is a centennial book published by the North Texas District Council of the Assemblies of God and a book about the Church of God in Christ.

As he began his research, he found himself "becoming aware of the vibrant phase into which Pentecostal historical studies has presently entered, both nationally and internationally." As other historians have observed, Melton suggests the Pentecostal movement has continued to grow from its inception in the United States. However, in the 1980s, he writes, it "entered a spectacular growth trajectory that led a number of religious historians to label the last century the 'Century of the Holy Spirit.'" Texas, in Melton's view, is "where Pentecostalism has enjoyed its greatest success."

Melton explains the emphasis of his work in the Introduction. He writes:


The main focus of this guide is a list of the more prominent people who have played a key role in the founding and/or development of the Pentecostal/Charismatic movement in the state of Texas. For those with a more mobile career, I have been most concerned about their in-store contributions but note that Texas continues to supply significant leadership nationally and internationally to the still expanding Pentecostal movement.

This Resource Guide, which is published in an 8 1/2 x 11 format (with coil binding), is 165 pages in length. It is well organized and reader friendly. Here's a look at the Table of Contents:

Table of Contents

Introduction: Why Texas, Why Pentecostalism?

I. General Sources for the Study of Pentecostalism in Texas

Prosperity Gospel Movement

New Apostolic Reformation

Primary Materials

II. Pentecostal Ministers in Texas in the Pre-World War II Era, 1900-1945

III. The Pentecostal/Charismatic Movement in Texas in the Post-World II Era, 1945-Present

Pentecostal Charismatic Ministers in Texas, 1945-Present

The Critique of Pentecostalism and Its Theology

Bibles with Annotations by Pentecostals

IV. African American Participation in the Pentecostal Movement in Texas

A Timeline, 1900-1955

The Jurisdictional Prelates (Bishops) and Supervisors of Women of the Church of God in Christ

African American Pentecostal Leadership in the Post World War II Era, 1945-Present

V. Mexican American and Additional Spanish-Speaking Pentecostals in Texas


*            *            *

Related article:

"Dr. J. Gordon Melton, Baylor Professor, is Doing Research on F.F. Bosworth: His investigation has taken him to the First Assembly of God Church in Dallas." See here.


-----------------------------------------------

Reminder: "F.F. Bosworth History" is now on Twitter. Follow @bosworth_fred

Note: My book, F.F. Bosworth: The Man Behind "Christ the Healer," can be purchased here with a 25% discount. Use the discount code: BOSWORTH25.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

Want to know more
about F.F. Bosworth?

Follow the Bosworth Matters blog!
Visit here:
ffbosworth.strikingly.com

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

For more information:
Visit the F.F. Bosworth page here. Questions about the research and commentary on F.F. Bosworth may be directed to Roscoe Barnes III, Ph.D., via email at doctorbarnes3@gmail.com or roscoebarnes3@yahoo.com. For updates on F.F. Bosworth history, simply follow this blog or @bosworth_fred and @Roscoebarnes3 on Twitter. #ChristTheHealer #BosworthMention #BosworthMatters

Friday, June 12, 2020

Scenes from The Natchez Bluffs and Under-the-Hill Historic District

Admiring the great Mississippi River

By Roscoe Barnes III
Copyright (c) 2020

#Natchez
#MichelleChildres
#RoscoeAndMichellesExcellentAdventure


Michelle Childres on the Mississippi River. Not a single cloud in the sky.

On Saturday, June 6, 2020, Michelle Childres and I took a stroll along the Mississippi River in Natchez, Miss. We toured the Natchez Bluffs and Under-the-Hill District. It was a brief #HistoryHunting trip. After taking in the beauty of it all, we had lunch at a Mexican restaurant.

I took a short break during our tour of the Bluffs.

After reviewing a few places on the river, Michelle and I concluded there's much more to see in Natchez. We're planning a return visit, and as we often do, we will see the historical sites and then go off the beaten path to see what we can find.

Michelle Childres admiring the river while observing a few people fishing.

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ROSCOE BARNES III, Ph.D., is a writer, chaplain, historian, and former newspaper reporter. He is the author of more than a dozen books and Gospel tracts. For more information about his work and history, see his Personal Profile here or visit his website: http://www.roscoebarnes.net. Connect with him on Twitter (@roscoebarnes3) or by email: roscoebarnes3@yahoo.com.

Thursday, June 11, 2020

My latest article: ‘Sometimes It's OK to Flee’

It discusses what the Book of Acts teaches us about safety and security in the face of danger

By Roscoe Barnes III, PhD
Copyright (c) 2020

I’m pleased to announce the publication of my most recent article, which is published by the South African Theological Seminary (SATS). It is titled, “Sometimes It's Ok to Flee: What the Book of Acts Teaches Us About Safety and Security in the Face of Danger.”

The article presents my view on church attendance and safety precautions during the COVID-19 pandemic. It offers a few lessons that we can learn from the believers in the Book Acts.
You can read it here or by following this link: 

In the article, I invite the reader to see the believers’ response to persecution as a model for today’s response to the pandemic. While noting that the passages in Acts refer specifically to persecution, I call for a broader application that includes any life-threatening crisis, including Covid19. I suggest the following:

“If Pentecostals can use this book of history as a model for speaking in tongues and evangelicals can use it as a model for missions and evangelism, can it not also be used as a model for persecution and suffering? I submit that the actions of the disciples, including the apostles, provide us with a model for dealing with threats and any situation that endangers our lives. At the same time, these experiences in the early church provide us with a few important lessons.”

I sincerely believe that if getting out of the path of danger was good enough for Paul and the early church, then it’s good enough for us.

#Covid19 #Pandemic #Coronavirus #Persecution #protest #SATS

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ROSCOE BARNES III, Ph.D., is a writer, chaplain, historian, and former newspaper reporter. He is the author of more than a dozen books and Gospel tracts. For more information about his work and history, see his Personal Profile here or visit his website: http://www.roscoebarnes.net. Connect with him on Twitter (@roscoebarnes3) or by email: roscoebarnes3@yahoo.com.

Wednesday, June 10, 2020

In Search of Blues Legend Robert L. Johnson, ‘King of the Delta Blues Singers’

A visit to his birthplace in Hazlehurst, Miss.

By Roscoe Barnes III, PhD
Copyright (c) 2020

#HistoryHunting
#RoscoeAndMichellesExcellentAdventures
#MichelleChildres

Michelle Childres here at Robert L. Johnson's house on
South Lowe Street in Hazlehurst, Miss.

Michelle Childres and I went history hunting on Saturday, May 30, 2020. This time we visited Hazlehurst, Miss., the birthplace of blues legend Robert L. Johnson (May 8, 1911 – August 16, 1938). Hazlehurst is the county seat of Copiah County.

After having breakfast at Waffle House in McComb, we drove up I-55 North to Hazlehurst, where we saw the sign honoring the bluesman with the words, "Robert L. Johnson Blues Memorial Highway." We took the exit near the sign and traveled east to Highway 51.  From there we drove North to the city's downtown area.


This sign appears on Interstate 55 near the South Hazlehurst Exit.


This marker is located in the downtown area Hazlehurst, Miss.

I'm here in front of Robert L. Johnson's house on South Lowe Street.

We visited the old house which is believed to be Johnson's birthplace. It is owned by Copiah County. The building, which is missing a roof, is located on South Lowe Street, right off of Downing Street behind the courthouse. According to Randall Day, executive director of the Hazlehurst Area Chamber of Commerce, the building was originally located on I-55. It was moved to a different location and about six years ago, it was moved to its present location. Day shared his remarks in a phone interview on Friday, May 29, 2020.

This building is owned by Copiah County, which hopes to restore it.

Michelle Childres taking a selfie in front of Robert L. Johnson's house.


I'm here at the back door of Robert L. Johnson's house.


This is the back side of Robert L. Johnson's house.

At one time there was talk of raising money to restore the house. Unfortunately, no one could prove 100 percent that Johnson lived in the house, according to Day. The fact that it has been modified over the years does not help, he said. Furthermore, he added, no one has been able to get a state architect to say it was built during the time they think Johnson lived in it. Without this confirmation or verification, efforts to get a grant have come to a halt, Day said. So for now, the building is just sitting in place, resting on bricks, as someone decides its future.


This beautiful monument is located in front of the courthouse.

We saw these guitars posted in several places in Hazlehurst.

After taking a few pics of the old box structure, Michelle and I headed to the Mississippi Music Museum, which is located in an old depot. Along the way, we saw a monument honoring Johnson in the center of the road in front of the courthouse. The inscription on the front of the monument notes Johnson was born in Hazlehurst. On the back, the inscription reads:


Robert Johnson’s recording career left an enormous legacy to American music. The body of his work is considered to be the most powerful of its kind.

His music struck a chord that continues to resonate. His blues addresses generations he never knew and made poetry of his vision and fears.

A haunting and lyrical portrait of the human spirit.

King of the Delta Blues Singers





Michelle Childres is a great photographer.

At the Mississippi Music Museum, located at 138 N Ragsdale Ave., we took pictures of a history marker posted outside. Unfortunately, the museum was closed during our visit. So we took photos of what we could see from the outside. The marker about Johnson features the following:


Robert Johnson

The legendary bluesman Robert Johnson was born on the northern outskirts of Hazlehurst to Julia Major and Noah Johnson, on May 8, 1911 (or possibly 1912). Johnson lived in Tunica County and in Memphis as a child, but in the early 1930s he returned for a stay in the Hazlehurst area, where he honed his skills playing with local blues guitarist Ike Zinnerman.





The museum was closed during our visit. I'm looking in from the outside.

Image of Robert L. Johnson on the glass.


Michelle Childres at the Mississippi Music Museum

The Mississippi Music Museum is located in this old train depot in Hazlehurst, Miss.


I'm standing in front of the Mississippi Music Museum.


This marker is posted outside the Mississippi Music Museum.

South of Hazlehurst is a town called Wesson. Outside this town is Beauregard Cemetery located at 1102-1135 Beauregard Rd, Wesson. This is where Robert Johnson reportedly spent a year learning to play guitar. Day said Johnson had spent a number of years in the Delta. During that time, he tried to play, but people said his music “sounded like chicken scratch.” In the early 1930s, Johnson returned to the Hazlehurst area. Day said he was looking for his biological father, whom he never found.



We were told that this cemetery is where Robert L. Johnson learned to
play guitar. He was taught here by Ike Zimmerman.

According to Day, it was in Beauregard Cemetery where Johnson received guitar lessons from Ike Zimmerman. “He came here and spent a year with Ike,” he said. “They sat on tombstones in the cemetery and practiced.”

When Johnson returned to the Delta, everyone was amazed at his talent and how quickly he’d learned to play. Some said he must have sold his soul to the devil. But it was Zimmerman – and not the devil – who taught him how to play, Day said.

Chuckling, Day added, “This is our version of the crossroads.”

Side note: According to one article, Zimmerman went on to become a Pentecostal preacher.



Roscoe Barnes III examining headstones.

Michelle and I explored the cemetery, looking for headstones that were around in the early 1930s. We tried to imagine what it was like for Johnson and Zimmerman to be playing in the cemetery under the moon light.



Michelle Childres examining gravesite.

After taking a few pics, we drove into Wesson and enjoyed a meal at Dump’s BBQ at 1033 Church St. The service was excellent and the prices were reasonable. The food was delicious. We sampled their pulled pork, sausage, ribs, baked beans, and potato salad with ice tea. We loved it!

The restaurant owner talked about Robert Johnson. He said Johnson’s family now lives in Crystal Springs, about 10 miles north of Hazlehurst.

We found this restaurant while driving through Wesson, Miss.


This is the meal that we ordered for lunch in Wesson, Miss.
#HistoryHunting #RobertJohnson RoscoeAndMichellesExcellentAdventure #Blues #Mississippi #MichelleChildres #Hazlehurst #BeauregardCemetery

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ROSCOE BARNES III, Ph.D., is a writer, chaplain, historian, and former newspaper reporter. He is the author of more than a dozen books and Gospel tracts. For more information about his work and history, see his Personal Profile here or visit his website: http://www.roscoebarnes.net. Connect with him on Twitter (@roscoebarnes3) or by email: roscoebarnes3@yahoo.com.

Two Bosworth-Related Articles Listed in 'Pneuma Review' Roundup

By Roscoe Barnes III, PhD Author,  F.F. Bosworth: The Man Behind "Christ the Healer" Copyright (c) 2020 #FFBosworth #Boswor...