Wednesday, August 15, 2018

F.F. Bosworth mentioned in J.D. King's Regeneration: A Complete History of Healing in the Christian Church

By Roscoe Barnes III
Author, F.F. Bosworth: The Man Behind Christ the Healer
Copyright (c) 2018

#FFBosworth
#BosworthMatters
#BosworthMention



Fred Francis Bosworth, author of Christ the Healer, is featured in J.D. King's three-volume work on healing in history. The work is titled, Regeneration: A Complete History of Healing in the Christian Church (Christos Publishing, 2017).

I'm happy to join other scholars in recommending this work, which will undoubtedly become the definitive, go-to source on divine healing.


Information on the three-volume set is available here.

The following statement is my official endorsement of King's excellent work on healing in church history:

"It is with great pleasure that I recommend the new book, Regeneration: A Complete History of Healing in the Christian Church by J.D. King. This exhaustive work presents readers with an excellent overview of the divine healing movement throughout church history. It uses critical analysis and insightful biographical narratives to recount the significant stories of the pioneers and leaders of the movement. The work is supported with sound documentation consisting of both primary and secondary sources. While it will certainly be useful to scholars, it will also be appreciated by students, ministers, and laity. One important feature of this research is the attention that King gives to the controversies and extremes surrounding the divine healing movement. In short, he leaves no stone unturned. Through this work King has shown himself to be a true scholar and solid historian of church history. Well done!"

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Would you like to know more
about F.F. Bosworth?

Follow the Bosworth Matters blog!

You can read it here:
ffbosworth.strikingly.com


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For more information:
Visit the F.F. Bosworth page here. Questions about the research and commentary on F.F. Bosworth may be directed to Roscoe Barnes III, Ph.D., via email at doctorbarnes3@gmail.com or roscoebarnes3@yahoo.com. For updates on F.F. Bosworth history, simply follow this blog or @Roscoebarnes3 on Twitter. #ChristTheHealer

Thursday, August 9, 2018

F.F. Bosworth and Kenneth Hagin Jr.

A Look at the Similarities in Their Writings on the Past Tense of God’s Word

By Roscoe Barnes III
Author, F.F. Bosworth: The Man Behind Christ the Healer
Copyright (c) 2018

#FFBosworth
#BosworthMatters





Kenneth Hagin Jr.’s booklet, The Past Tense of God’s Word (Kenneth Hagin Ministries, 1980), is very similar to F.F. Bosworth’s booklet, The Past Tenses of God’s Word (1940?), which was sold and promoted by Bosworth in the 1940s. The content of Bosworth's booklet is also published as Chapter 8 – “How to Have Your Prayers Answered,” in his classic, Christ the Healer.

An examination of Hagin's booklet reveals he borrowed heavily from Bosworth’s writings. He mentions Bosworth in the third paragraph of Chapter 1 (page 1) and includes this quote:

In the words of F.F. Bosworth, “The Gospel is a world-wide emancipation proclamation of liberty from service and bondage to the old tyrant master of sin and sickness – the devil.”

That quote, however, is the only place in the book where Bosworth’s name is mentioned. Although several lines, words and ideas appear to be lifted from Bosworth’s booklet, Bosworth is not given credit for the material and he is not identified as the source for the message presented by Hagin. In some places, Hagin uses the same verses of Scripture that Bosworth uses.

Below are examples of the material used by Hagin followed by the content in Bosworth’s book.

KENNETH HAGIN JR.:
When Jesus said, “It is finished” on the cross, he meant the work He was sent to accomplish was finished. It is finished! It’s in the past tense. It has been taken care of. And everything included in that statement “it is finished” is for you and me today. (p. 1)


F.F. BOSWORTH:
When Jesus said “It is finished,” He meant that the work was done – completed as God sees it; and God expects us to reckon as done what Jesus says was done. The past tenses of God’s word mean a settled, sealed and final decision of His Will. (p. 2)

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HAGIN:
Hope expects it “sometimes.”
Faith takes it now. (p. 2)

BOSWORTH:
Hope is expecting a blessing sometime in the future; but faith is taking now what God offers. (p. 2)

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HAGIN:
It is important as we seek after the mercies and benefits of God to appropriate them by faith. This means actually taking them. (p. 2)

BOSWORTH:
It is important for seekers after the mercies of God to see that appropriating faith is taking and using what God offers to us. (p. 2)

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HAGIN:
Galatians 3:13 says, “Christ HATH redeemed us from the curse of the law ….” Is “hath” past tense or future tense? It’s past tense, isn’t it?

The Word of God puts our redemption from the curse in the past tense. We receive our deliverance because it’s in the past tense. It already has been taken care of. It’s not up to God now; it’s up to you. You have the responsibility. (p. 5)

BOSWORTH:
In Galatians 3:13, we read “Christ hath (past tense) redeemed us from the curse of the law, being made a cruse for us.” God has put our redemption from the curse of the law in the past tense, and we receive our deliverance when we do the same. (p. 2-3)

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HAGIN:
Look at Isaiah 53:4: “Surely he HATH BORNE our griefs and CARRIED our sorrows….” Are those verbs in the past tense? Yes.

Look at Matthew 8:17, “Himself TOOK our infirmities, and BARE our sicknesses ….” Past, present, or future tense? “Took” and “bare” are past tense. Because he took our infirmities in the past, we can claim the promise now and take it into the present – because it is ours.

For example, look at the Scripture “by whose stripes ye WERE healed (1 Peter 2:24). “Were is past tense. Therefore, if we “were” healed – bring it into the present tense – we ARE healed. (p. 6)

BOSWORTH:
In God’s Word we read “Surely He hath (past tense) borne our sicknesses and carried our pain” – “Himself took (past tense) our infirmities and bare our sicknesses” – “By Whose stripes ye were healed.”

God wants us all to appropriate the past tenses of His Word regarding His redemption of our souls and bodies from sickness and disease and go forth in obedience acting as if we believed him. When God puts a promise in the past tense, He thus authorizes and expects us to do the same. Nothing short of this is appropriating faith. (p. 3)

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HAGIN:
Mark 11:24 is a familiar passage of Scripture; especially from a fellow by the name of Kenneth E. Hagin. (He didn’t write it, contrary to what some people think!) it says, “…when ye pray, believe that ye RECEIVE them, and ye shall have them.” Notice it doesn’t say “you are going to receive them” (future tense). No, you receive them (present tense). (p. 10)

BOSWORTH:
In Mark 11:24 Jesus authorizes us and commands us to put the reception of the blessing we pray for in the past tense. He says, when we ask for what He offers, Believe that ye have received them, and ye shall have them.”  (P. 3-4)

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HAGIN:
We must continue to realize that God’s past-tense Word can only become present tense in our lives as we act upon it. God can’t do anything about it until we do.

I realize some of you won’t like me to say that, but if God already has done something about it, then His responsibility has ended and ours has begun. (p. 10-11)


BOSWORTH:
We are to continue to believe that God gave us what we asked for when we prayed, and continue to praise and thank Him for what he has given us. (p. 3-4)

But all of God’s blessings are OFFERED gifts as well as promised, and therefore need to be accepted; and the responsibility for their transfer is ours. This clears God of all responsibility for any failures. (p. 8)

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HAGIN:
Jesus Christ Himself demonstrated this when he raised Lazarus from the dead. Remember the story? Jesus’ best friend was lying dead I a cave. Jesus stood outside that tomb and, while Lazarus was still dead, said – talking to His Father – “Father, I thank thee that thou HAST heard me” (John 11:41).

The sick who are praying for healing need to say – before it ever materializes – “Father, I thank thee that thou hast heard me.” (p. 12)

BOSWORTH:
Jesus, at the grave of Lazarus, said, while Lazarus was still dead, “I thank Thee that Thou hast heard me.

The sick who pray for healing are to say before their healing materializes, “Father, I thank Thee that Thou hast heard me.” (p. 4-5)

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HAGIN:
So we stand there with the prayer of faith, believing we have been heard before we ever see any manifestation. (p. 13)

BOSWORTH:
The Prayer of faith is believing our prayer is heard before the answer materializes – before the answer is manifested. (p. 5)

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HAGIN:
Faith refuses to see anything contrary to what God’s Word says. (p. 16-17)

BOSWORTH:
Faith refuses to see (as reason for doubting) anything contrary to the Word of God. (p. 5)

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HAGIN:
With our natural eyes we see only temporal, materialistic things. But with the eyes of our spirit, we can begin to behold supernatural, satisfying, lasting realities of God’s spiritual, eternal kingdom. (P. 16-17)

BOSWORTH:
With our natural eyes we see only the temporal and inferior things of earth, but with the enlightened eyes of our understanding we behold the superior, satisfying and lasting realities of God’s spiritual and eternal Kingdom. (p. 5-6)

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HAGIN:
God said to Abram, “…for a father of many nations HAVE I made thee.” Do you know what Abram did? Immediately he changed his name to Abraham to mean what God said he was going to be!

Notice that God said, “I HAVE [past tense] made thee the father of many nations” (Gen. 17:5). He didn’t say he was “going to” (future tense). (p. 19)

BOSWORTH:
God said to Abraham, “A father of many nations have I made thee” (past tense), and since God put this promise in the past tense, Abraham did the same and acted his faith by taking his new name, “Abraham” which means “the father of a multitude”. (p. 6)

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HAGIN:
Suppose someone came to me and said, “Brother Hagin, I appreciate you. Here is a title deed to such-and-such a house. It’s worth $100,000. I’ll sign it over to you. It’s all yours, legally signed.”

I could put that house on the market and sell it without even having seen it. Why? Because I’ve got the title deed. I could even turn around and give the house to somebody and never see it. It’s mine. I can do with it what I will.

Faith is the evidence – or title deed – of things not yet seen. (p. 19-20)

BOSWORTH:
If someone should deed you a home that you had never seen, you actually have a home before you see it. “Faith is the evidence (title deed) of things not (yet) seen”. A deed makes a home so much yours that you can sell it without every seeing it. Faith is believing you have what God says you have and acting accordingly before you either feel or see that you have it. (p. 6-7)

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HAGIN:
But you see, these promises are not just promises; the promise has already been taken care of through Jesus Christ’s death and resurrection. He already has taken care of the promises. They are offered to us because they have been taken care of. That puts the responsibility on us to take these offers and use them. (p. 23)


BOSWORTH:
“Were the gifts of God for soul and body merely PROMISED gifts, we would have to wait for the Promiser to fulfill His promises, and the responsibility would be on Him. But all of God’s blessings are OFFERED gifts as well as promised, and therefore need to be accepted; and the responsibility for their transfer is ours. This clears God of all responsibility for any failures. (p. 8)

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HAGIN:
The only reason you weren’t saved the year before you were saved wasn’t God’s fault, was it? God had already purchased salvation. The responsibility was yours to accept it. (p. 25)

BOSWORTH:
The only reason you were not saved a year earlier than you were is that you did not take what God had provided and was offering to you. God was not making you wait; you were making Him wait. (p. 8)

Giving credit to whom it is due

It is both surprising and unfortunate that Hagin failed to acknowledge Bosworth's contribution. It is stunningly sad to see the extent he went to present the ideas and words as his own, with no credit being given to the actual source of his message.

Hagin should have followed the example set by T. L. Osborn who fully acknowledged the people he cited, as well as those from whom he borrowed ideas about healing. In other words, he gave credit to whom it was due. For example, when Osborn published One Hundred Divine Healing Facts (Harrison House, 1983), he included this note:

In presenting 100 Divine Healing Facts, we are indebted to the resourceful writings of F.F. Bosworth, from which several of the thoughts expressed have been gleaned.

His faith literature has brought healing within the grasp of many thousands who could not have recovered without knowing the truths which it contains.

By reading his book, Christ the Healer, you can get in just a few hours what took Rev. Bosworth thirty years of hard work in a healing ministry all over the United States and Canada to learn. I urge every Christian, pastor, teacher, and evangelist to obtain a copy of this masterpiece in faith building and read it repeatedly.

T.L. Osborn

 Hagin could have also learned from Bosworth who fully acknowledged E.W. Kenyon as his source of inspiration (and ideas) for the booklet, The Christian Confession (copies available through Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center: https://ifphc.org). On the final page of his booklet, Bosworth wrote:

Some of the thoughts expressed in the first part of this booklet were brought together by permission from the writings of Rev. E.W. Kenyon, Author of “The Father and His Family”, “The Wonderful Name of Jesus”, “In His Presence”, “Two Kinds of Love”, and other writings. Address, Kenyon Gospel Publication Society, 1901 Fourth Avenue, North, Seattle 9, Washington.

F.F. Bosworth
P.O. Box 5
Biscayne Annex
Miami, Florida

One can hope that by bringing attention to this topic, Hagin and others will come to see the importance of truth, integrity, transparency, and the Christian call to fully acknowledge the works of others by giving them the credit they deserve. As Christians, we should also remember to do unto others as we would have them do unto us. The church should be a light and set an example for others to follow.
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Resource:

The image and content for F.F. Bosworth’s booklets, The Past Tenses of God’s Word, and The Christian Confession, were obtained through the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center (https://ifphc.org), Springfield, Mo.


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Would you like to know more
about F.F. Bosworth?

Follow the Bosworth Matters blog!

You can read it here:
ffbosworth.strikingly.com

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

For more information:
Visit the F.F. Bosworth page here. Questions about the research and commentary on F.F. Bosworth may be directed to Roscoe Barnes III, Ph.D., via email at doctorbarnes3@gmail.com or roscoebarnes3@yahoo.com. For updates on F.F. Bosworth history, simply follow this blog or @Roscoebarnes3 on Twitter. #ChristTheHealer


Tuesday, August 7, 2018

The Writings of Kenneth Hagin Jr. and F.F. Bosworth

By Roscoe Barnes III
Author, F.F. Bosworth: The Man Behind Christ the Healer

Copyright (c) 2018

#FFBosworth
#BosworthMatters




I'm reading Kenneth Hagin Jr.'s mini-book, The Past Tense of God's Word. It is VERY similar to #FFBosworth's booklet, The Past Tenses of God's Word. Lots of borrowing. Stay tuned for new blog post.

#FFBosworth #ChristTheHealer #Pentecostal #BosworthMention ChurchHistory #CFNI #Evangelicals #WordOfFaith #AssembliesOfGod



Friday, August 3, 2018

Wilkinson County Prison Celebrates 5-Year Anniversary

Commemoration Observed by Community Leaders, Elected
Officials, Representatives of Law Enforcement

By Roscoe Barnes III


Wilkinson County Correctional Facility (WCCF) recently celebrated Management & Training Corporation’s (MTC) 5-year anniversary as operator of the Woodville facility. From left: Deputy Warden of Operations Gabriel Walker, Warden Jody Bradley, Deputy Warden of Programs Tonya Toomey, and Warden Frank Shaw of East Mississippi Correctional Facility (EMCF) in Meridian. Shaw was WCCF warden when MTC took over the facility in 2013. Bradley became warden of WCCF in 2015.
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WOODVILLE, Miss. -- Wilkinson County Correctional Facility (WCCF) held a special luncheon recently to celebrate Management & Training Corporation’s (MTC) 5-year anniversary as operator of the Woodville facility.

Monique Alexander, administrative assistant, organized the event which took place on Tuesday, July 31, 2018, in the Visitation Room of WCCF. More than 80 people attended, including 30 guests and the 50 staff members who were honored for their five years of service.

Local community leaders and elected officials joined in the commemoration. Chief Jesse Stewart of the Woodville Police Department participated, as did Sheriff Travis Patten, who came with several deputies and officers from the Adams County Sheriff Office in Natchez.

Woodville Mayor Keshia Stewart Ford and Circuit Clerk J. Lynn Delaney also took part in the celebration, along with the Rev. James and Louise Hardy.

“This is a celebration of each other” Warden Jody Bradley said of WCCF staff. “Nothing’s more righteous in our business than taking care of each other.”

Bradley has served as WCCF warden since 2015. He took over after Warden Frank Shaw, who now serves at East Mississippi Correctional Facility (EMCF) in Meridian. EMCF is also managed by MTC.

Shaw became the warden of WCCF on July 1, 2013, when the management of the facility transitioned from Corrections Corporation of America (CCA) to MTC. Shaw returned to WCCF for the anniversary.

“Woodville is a very welcoming community and a good place to live,” he said as he reminisced on his time in Wilkinson County. “This is a good facility. You do what you can to provide important services and meet the needs of the offenders.”

When MTC took over, its goal was to give the offenders opportunities to be educated and attend programs “so we could help them turn their lives around,” Shaw said.

“I had amazing people who worked with me and it made all the difference in the world,” he explained. “I thank you for making my first two years here incredible.”

Larry Lee, contract monitor for the Mississippi Department of Corrections (MDOC), congratulated WCCF on behalf of the state. “I was here when MTC came,” he said. “It was interesting to see the transition take place. It’s an awesome pleasure to take part in this event today.”

Bradley, who has more than 30 years of experience in corrections, served as warden of WCCF shortly after it opened in 1998. He said the facility is continuing to make progress as it works to change lives for the better.

The facility is seeing a drastic reduction in the number of “uses of force,” he said. It is seeing a growing number of GED graduates and proud achievements in other areas as well, he said.

WCCF is a 1,000 bed facility located at 2999 U.S. Highway 61 North in Woodville, in southwest Mississippi. Its managing company, MTC, was founded in 1981. MTC is a privately-held company headquartered in Centerville, Utah.

Representatives of law enforcement in Woodville and Natchez joined in the celebration of MTC/WCCF’s 5-year anniversary. Pictured from left: Sheriff Travis Patten, who came with several deputies and officers from the Adams County Sheriff Office in Natchez; Warden Jody Bradley; and Chief Jesse Stewart of the Woodville Police Department.

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ROSCOE BARNES III, Ph.D., is a writer, chaplain, historian, and former newspaper reporter. He is the author of more than a dozen books and Gospel tracts. For more information about his work and history, see his Personal Profile here or visit his website: http://www.roscoebarnes.net. Connect with him on Twitter (@roscoebarnes3) or by email: roscoebarnes3@yahoo.com.

Wednesday, August 1, 2018

F.F. Bosworth Mentioned in Josh McMullen's Under the Big Top: Big Tent Revivalism and American Culture, 1885-1925

Book Notes His Prolific Output as a Writer

By Roscoe Barnes III
Author, F.F. Bosworth: The Man Behind Christ the Healer
Copyright (c) 2018

#FFBosworth
#BosworthMatters
#BosworthMention


F.F. Bosworth's name is sprinkled in several places in the 2015 book  by Josh McMullen titled, Under the Big Top: Big Tent Revivalism and American Culture, 1885-1925 (Oxford University Press). McMullen is assistant professor of History at Regent University. He holds a Ph.D. in History from the University of Missouri-Columbia and a Master's degree in Theology and Church History from Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary.

In McMullen's view, the tent preachers played an active role "in the shift away from Victorianism and helped in the construction of a new consumer culture in the United States." He grapples with the idea of the United States becoming "the most consumer-driven and yet one of the most religious societies in the western world." He describes in compelling terms the use of entertainment by evangelicals to support their revival meetings, along with their effective use of various media to grow their respective ministries. In short, McMullen sees a strong link between revivalism and consumerism.


Information on Under the Big Top is available here.

McMullen mentions Bosworth in several places. He gives a summary of Bosworth's life history with brief comments on his teachings as a healing evangelist. McMullen writes about several people that had an impact on Bosworth's development as a revivalist. Those people included John Alexander Dowie and Maria Woodworth-Etter. McMullen notes the role that Woodworth played in Bosworth’s revival meetings in Dallas, Texas, that reportedly lasted 10 years. He writes:

It is through her writings that Woodworth became acquainted with F.F. Bosworth. As a pastor in Dallas, Bosworth had read Woodworth’s autobiography, calling it the greatest record of God’s victory over sin and sickness since the Bible. In 1912 Bosworth invited Maria Woodworth to Dallas to help lead a tent revival, which extended from July to September of that year. The joint effort between Bosworth and Woodworth drew people from across the United States as well as England and Canada. Other divine healers even traveled to Dallas to witness the miracles that were said to be occurring nightly at the hands of these two evangelists.

McMullen cites the personal letter of Bosworth that discussed the beating he suffered for preaching to blacks in Hearne, Texas. He also recounts Bosworth's departure from the Assemblies of God over the issue of tongues as the initial evidence of Spirit baptism. Despite breaking fellowship with the Pentecostal denomination, "Bosworth continued to be a major proponent of divine healing," McMullen writes.

McMullen's research includes other commonly known reports about Bosworth, such as the death of Bosworth's first wife, Estella. He correctly notes the importance of Bosworth's book, Christ the Healer, and the evangelist's prolific output as a writer. He explains:


Bosworth was also a prolific writer. His articles on divine healing and revivals appeared constantly in religious periodicals; however, it was the book Christ the Healer for which Bosworth became best known. Written intentionally in “the vocabulary common people understand,” Christ the Healer turned out to be the leading guide of the divine healing movement.

McMullen's study extends to 1925, a time period that saw notable growth and success in Bosworth's ministry. His book, Christ the Healer, was published in 1924. His biography, Joybringer Bosworth, was first published in 1921. It was written by Eunice M. Perkins. It was during the 1920s that Bosworth held some of his largest healing campaigns.

Whatever one thinks of McMullen's argument -- and his views regarding consumerism and revival meetings -- his work shows that Bosworth matters in discussions about church history. McMullen points to him as an important proponent of divine healing whose ministry and writings made a significant contribution to revivalists and the divine healing movement in the United States.


 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Would you like to know more
about F.F. Bosworth?

Follow the Bosworth Matters blog! 

You can read it here:
ffbosworth.strikingly.com

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

For more information:
Visit the F.F. Bosworth page here. Questions about the research and commentary on F.F. Bosworth may be directed to Roscoe Barnes III, Ph.D., via email at doctorbarnes3@gmail.com or roscoebarnes3@yahoo.com. For updates on F.F. Bosworth history, simply follow this blog or @Roscoebarnes3 on Twitter. #ChristTheHealer

Tuesday, July 31, 2018

Prayer at 5-Year Anniversary Luncheon Held by Mississippi Prison

Event Held on Tuesday, July 31, 2018, at MTC/Wilkinson County Correctional Facility

By Chaplain Roscoe Barnes III, Ph.D.
Copyright (c) 2018

#Prayer #PrisonMinistry



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Our Heavenly Father, Lord God Most High:

We come before you on this special occasion with hearts of gratitude and humility. We thank you for everything we have been able to accomplish to this point, and for what we hope to accomplish in the future.

Today we celebrate a milestone, a precious moment in our history that bears witness to your providential care.

Lord, we can see that we have come a mighty long way. It has not been easy. But through it all, we have faced our challenges with grit and grace, always determined to show our staff, our inmates, and our community, that we care.

As we celebrate our five-year anniversary, we want to thank you for our leadership and our staff, who have worked so hard – and so diligently against the odds -- to bring us to this moment. Indeed, we have come this far by faith.

Lord, we are mindful of the support we have received from our local community, our volunteers, our elected officials, businesses, and individuals. We also thank you for all of our guests who are here today.

As we pray, we ask that your light of goodness and mercy shine upon each of us as we participate in today’s program. And may your blessings be upon the meal that’s prepared for this special event. We ask that this meal would be blessed and sanctified for our nourishment, and that your grace will be known by those who prepared it.

We ask for these things in your name.

And every heart said, Amen.

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ROSCOE BARNES III, Ph.D., is a writer, chaplain, historian, and former newspaper reporter. He is the author of more than a dozen books and Gospel tracts. For more information about his work and history, see his Personal Profile here or visit his website: http://www.roscoebarnes.net. Connect with him on Twitter (@roscoebarnes3) or by email: roscoebarnes3@yahoo.com.

Saturday, July 28, 2018

F.F. Bosworth Mentioned in Kate Bowler's Blessed: A History of The American Prosperity Gospel (2013)

She Highlights His Link to E.W. Kenyon

By Roscoe Barnes III
Author, F.F. Bosworth: The Man Behind Christ the Healer
Copyright (c) 2018

#FFBosworth
#BosworthMention
#BosworthMatters



F.F. Bosworth, Pentecostal pioneer and famous healing evangelist, is featured in the 2013 book by Kate Bowler titled, Blessed: A History of The American Prosperity Gospel (Oxford University Press).  Bowler, who holds a Doctor of Philosophy degree, is an assistant professor of the History of Christianity in North America at Duke University. Her book presents a detailed look at the roots and the rise of the prosperity gospel in the United States and Canada.

Bowler's website suggests Blessed is "the first comprehensive American history of one of the most popular Christian movements in the world today."

Information on Blessed is available here:
https://katebowler.com/research

In her reference to Bosworth, Bowler discusses his relationship with E.W. Kenyon and the possible influence that Kenyon had on his understanding of faith and confession. She also reports that a number of Bosworth's articles appeared in Kenyon's Herald of Life newsletter.

Bowler notes that when Bosworth included the chapter, "Our Confession," in his book, Christ the Healer, he fully acknowledged Kenyon's contribution. She writes: "Unlike many others, Bosworth credited Kenyon for his words."

Although Bosworth was known for his work as a Pentecostal revivalist and faith healer, the truth is that he was actually more evangelical and ecumenical in his ministry, especially after 1918. Bowler correctly notes that he "hovered on the margins of Pentecostalism." She points out the fact that he left the Assemblies of God in 1918 because he did not believe in tongues as the initial evidence of Spirit baptism. He later spent decades as a minister with the Christian and Missionary Alliance.

Like other historians of Pentecostal church history, Bowler recounts Bosworth's ministry with William Branham, Gordon Lindsay, and the Voice of Healing in the 1940s and 1950s. She suggests that he was instrumental in keeping Kenyon's teachings before a new generation of healing evangelists. She explains:

"As his healing practices and revival techniques proved to be a textbook for later healing revivalists, Bosworth cemented Kenyon's imprint on divine health long after anyone remembered Kenyon's name."

In several places Bowler shows how Bosworth's teachings on healing and health were similar to Kenyon's. She gives attention to "appropriating faith" and "confession," among other topics.

She makes one claim, however, that raises concern about Bosworth and the subject of prosperity. She asserts: "Though Bosworth never preached about prosperity, he placed the righteous individual, speaking faith-filled words, at the heart of divine healing."

It isn't clear why she makes that claim regarding prosperity, but the truth is, Bosworth did preach and write about prosperity. In fact, he wrote, The Key to The Windows of Heaven or God's Financial Plan, with supplement, Should Sinners Tithe?

The 24-page booklet makes an argument for paying tithes. It discusses the material blessings for doing so, as well as the temporal blessings that come through giving. Bosworth described New Testament giving as "sowing and reaping."

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Would you like to know more
about F.F. Bosworth?

Follow the Bosworth Matters blog!

You can start right here:
ffbosworth.strikingly.com

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

For more information:
Visit ffbosworth.strikingly.com. The Bosworth page is here. Questions about the research and commentary on F.F. Bosworth may be directed to Roscoe Barnes III, Ph.D., via email at doctorbarnes3@gmail.com or roscoebarnes3@yahoo.com. For updates on F.F. Bosworth history, simply follow this blog or @Roscoebarnes3 on Twitter. #ChristTheHealer

F.F. Bosworth mentioned in J.D. King's Regeneration: A Complete History of Healing in the Christian Church

By Roscoe Barnes III Author, F.F. Bosworth: The Man Behind Christ the Healer Copyright (c) 2018 #FFBosworth #BosworthMatters #Bosworth...